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The Jag XJ-S story part 3.

The saga continues, we find the 'Black Pearl' at Snetterton 07.

Racing is bloody brilliant, the thrill and excitement of a fierce battle on the circuit, the feeling of achievement, the nomex underwear…

There was a point where I didn’t think I was going to get to the first race of the season, I had to make large repair sections to the underside of the car, many of the ageing bolts on this classic Jag had sheared during the rebuild, the trailer I bought on ebay didn’t turn up, the race tickets didn’t turn up and the day before the race the gearbox developed the ability to engage more than one gear . But we like challenges don’t we?

I put all other work on hold and tackled each problem in turn, and by the day before the race the only problem left was how to get the car to the race. Luckily Dave Ried turned up trumps and lent me his new trailer for the weekend, top bloke.

I got to Snetterton at midnight, pitched my new tent (special offer from the supermarket) and passed out. I awoke at 4am because it was bloody freezing, the cheap tent offered no wind protection and even less insulation, so I took it apart and covered the back of the Disco with it and slept quite comfortably on the back seat instead. Never buy cheap camping equipment.

Glorious sunshine greeted me as I emerged from my nylon and tank tap encrusted retreat on Saturday morning. It was great to meet up with my fellow racers again and swap similar tails of last minuet repairs. Last minuet is one thing, but Crash Gordan trumped us all by actually rebuilding his entire cooling system between races, turning up to a race in a car you haven’t finished building yet is pure class.
The morning started at a rush, Signing on, briefing, scrutineering and qualifying all managed to be timed to overlap, resulting in a significant amount of running and swearing.

Once out for the qualifying session I had time to relax a bit, but then it occurred to me I couldn’t remember if I had torqued up the wheel nuts, needles to say my first lap was conservative. But after a few laps, gathering pace with nothing major falling off, I started to feel quite happy with the car.

The suspension and final drive mods seemed to work rather well and inspired confidence, my home brewed exhaust sounded commandingly raucous and the engine pulled strongly past about 120mph. Crikey, it felt good.

I am used to qualifying last, but this time managed to have four cars behind me at the start of the first race. As the start lights went out I managed to loose all four places in the first hundred yards. Now I was in familiar territory, but it soon became clear that the car was faster than the one in front which meant it was time to practice the high art of overtaking. Unfortunately I am crap at this, but after dithering on several corners I worked out a safe place to go for it and dived up the inside of the first car, then I remembered to breathe again. The next car was taken on the straight, the new diff proving absolutely spot on as I crept past at about 130mph, whilst all the time my mind was screaming to slow down for the next corner. Another two cars were taken before the end of the race leaving me 22nd out of 28 starters with two cars not finishing.

Gordans old car was driven by Mike Sharman, new to the series, who took off like a thing possessed and won the class 1st rather decisively. So it looks like I will have a lot more competition this year and my hopes of getting a few class 2nd s started fading.

The second race was on the Sunday and the grid positions were based on the results of the previous race which meant no less than six cars starting behind me. I was determined to get my start right this time so I talked to the drivers starting around me to get an idea of what to do, Paul Reynolds and Crash Gordan were really helpful and a strategy was hatched.

Sitting on the grid I was still nervous, but when the start lights went out I dived up the outside of two cars in front of me, excellent! Into the first corner surrounded by sliding jaguars, it seemed impossible get that many cars round such a small corner. I conceded the two places to my fellow racers who were much faster, not wishing to slow them up. On the straight I was behind Crash Gordan who is the fastest chap in our class, I figured that if I could just keep up with him then I would learn something. Unfortunately all I learned I s how important it is to prep your car, as his coolant system exploded and covered my windscreen in glycol. The fact that I couldn’t see through it was resolved when I tried to brake and simply went very sideways, sliding on his glycol slick, thus allowing me to see where I was going through the side window.
Setting the suspension up to be progressive paid off as the car waggled through the esses with the casual flair of a drunken tango dancer, but crucially managed to stay on the track. Which was nice. Unfortunately other, faster, racers were not so lucky, have a look at Dave Robbies web site for more info.


I made up a couple of places and was sitting 3rd in class again when I rounded the final corner, at the end of the long straight I could see the chequered flag out, but also I could see the 2nd in class chap easing up. It was an opportunity too good to miss so I stayed in second gear and buried the accelerator, I saw the rev counter go into the red, so obviously I stopped looking at it and kept accelerating. I think that if I had to drive the racer home then I wouldn’t have done that, just goes to show that having a trailer is worth seconds on the track. I got six inches in front of him at the finish line and won the first trophy of my life for 2nd in class, the phrase ‘well chuffed’ springs to mind.


There are still mods to be done, however. The diff is cooking due to the inboard brakes. After a cool down lap and a 10 min delay in parc ferme, I measured the rear diff casing temperature at 160 C. That counts as ‘bad’.
Also, when giving it some beans the cooling system couldn’t cope and the temperature started to rocket. On the track I started to use top gear more which helped keep the temp under control but did nothing for my lap times.
I now have a 6 litre XJ40 in pieces in the workshop so the next mod is to get the outboard brakes fitted and see if I can use bits of its cooling system (which is a lot neater than the XJ-S).
I hope to have this all done for Mallory, fingers crossed.

Mallory 07

Well that went with a bang! The Mallory race started of with pouring rain, which posed a new challenge as I have never raced in the wet before. But we like challenges don’t we? (am I repeating myself again...)

Cunningly I had plastered the windows with rain repellent and the inside with anti-fog, which worked a treat. Whilst other cars were struggling for visibility and grip, I was merely struggling for grip. I started off very conservatively in practice, feeling my way round and slowly building pace but it very soon became clear by the way the car veered sideways at every opportunity, that there was not much more pace to build. Then it started raining harder.

After lunch, the first races included MR2's and single seaters, both having substantial 'offs' and a number of Toyotas limping back to the pits heavily damaged. This was like an old fashioned warning, a bit like when they used to put severed heads on spikes on the city walls to warn incomers, but without the hygiene issues.
Just before our race was called, the sun came out. In practice I had dropped my tyre pressures to try to get some warmth in, without much success, but now I swiftly set about pumping the tyres up with my nice shiny new high power 12v compressor, the sort that burns your cigarette lighter wiring out, I like over powered motors.
By the way, I now have a race 'team' which is a novel experience. Well, I say 'team' its only three other people and a 'sponsor' but it’s a team to me. I am still used to doing everything myself and haven’t got the hang of delegation yet so they spent most of the time hanging around asking to help, but give it time. We have Nick being race mechanic, Kev being in charge of tents and food, Chris in charge of logistics. My new sponsor is Rik and Lotty who happen to have a vinyl cutter and made me some excellent stickers, they also run a driving school in Birmingham and are very nice people (www.auto-success.co.uk). Right, that’s my part of the bargain done.


Back to the race, it started well enough but the track was still very slippery just off the racing line and as the first overtaking started, so did the graceful ballet of sideways Jags. Going into the esses I was right on the tail of number 47 Paul Reynolds, who is usually the second in class bloke and significantly better than me. A car span in front of us, in a split second Paul had gone to the left and I chose the right but as we passed the stricken car I had a straight run up the hill to the hair pin but Paul was still on the grass. I just got ahead but he was not going to give up easily and went up the inside into the hairpin, I dropped it into first and slid round just in front again then got away cleanly down the hill. My heart was pounding, this was proper racing and as a novice it was quite an experience.

I even started making a little headway, almost getting the hang of it, when a number of cars arrived on the inside just as I went into the big corner at Gerards. There was some tyre squeal, a degree of rotation, a thump and then I was hurtling towards gravel. Now, gravel stops cars and I didn’t want to stop, so I kept my foot in, aimed for the shortest rout across the trap and onto the grass beyond. Now my off road racing paid off as the V12 Jag snaked across the wet grass in a merry salsa back towards the track. But not before Paul had cruised past.

Well, that’s racing. I have to fix the front wing, door, bumper, front and rear suspension on the right and something's bent in the transmission. Time to take it apart again.

Obviously with the engine and gearbox working well it was time to take them out.
For some stupid reason I got it into my head that fitting the 6 litre V12 from an XJ40 (XJ81) would be a good move because it comes with the 4 speed electric auto box. Needless to say trying to integrate the control systems and wiring with that of an ageing XJ-S proved challenging. Also the gearbox is bigger, needing extensive transmission tunnel modifications and a custom prop shaft. The front of the engine uses a single serpentine drive belt so I had to connect the PAS pump to the existing rack but gut the hydraulic pump that sits behind it to make things work. I also gutted the air con pump to use it as an idler. I saved a few kilos by using the ally XJ40 radiator, which doesn't fit and required a custom made ally cross member....
Anyway, somehow we got it all running the night before the Silverstone national, but during practice the gearbox ecu slightly caught fire, leaving me with only 3rd gear. Surmising this might make the race a bit tricky I cobbled together a switch arrangement to allow me to choose between 2nd and 3rd. The race started and I leisurely pulled away in 2nd, up to 3rd for the right hander and fairly swiftly the engine hits the rev limiter. Oh dear. So I grab the loose wire that engages 4th and shart it against the gear stick, this gives me enough gears to keep up and start making head way again. Unfortunately the broken gearbox ecu seems to have caused the engine ecu to run retarded, the exhaust is so hot that my seat starts to get very warm indeed and I see some degree of smoke in the mirror. OK, ease of a tad then, avoid catching fire, that has to be the best strategy at this point. But the car is still capable of annoying tail enders and we even manage a spot of overtaking.
The reward of all this loonacy is 2nd in class, another fantastic day at the back of the field!

Never buy cheap camping kit...
 
It survives Snett, with trophies too.
A wet Mallory, thrills and spills to come.
A damp start.
But drying for the race.
The hairpin.
Side by side and flat out.
Obviously it ends in tears...
A big change as the 6 litre goes in, and more rust comes out.
New logo too.
how low can you go.
A 'repaired' wing, ahem....
 

©Ralph Hosier